whiskey

Adega Paulo da Fonseca is proud to represent the best whiskey brands. Whiskey is a distilled beverage from malt fermentation. Malt, in turn, is a grain that germinated and then dried. There are 4 main differences between the types of whiskey: the grain used, the production process, the manufacturing origin and the maturation time. The first evidence of distillation in Scotland dates back to the 15th century and the first whiskey was a drink widely used as a medicine in the treatment of various ailments. Originally produced by monks, whiskey production moved to Scottish homes and farmhouses after the closure of monasteries ordered by King Henry VII. Time passed and the whiskey production process was refined, making the drink practically a “basic food” in Scotland.

Summary of Whiskey Types - Scotch Whiskey : To be considered a Scotch whiskey, the drink must be made in Scotland, with barley or malted grains and aged in oak barrels for at least 3 years; Irish Whiskey : More fruity and slightly peppery, they are made from a mixture of non-smoked and unroasted barley and are triple distilled, making them smoother; Japanese whiskey : In less than a century of history (it has been manufactured since 1920), Japanese whiskey managed to surpass traditional manufacturers and, in 2014, it was considered the best whiskey in the world. Produced in a similar way to Scotch whiskey, the whiskeys from the Yamazaki distillery undergo a longer fermentation process and their maturation also goes through Japanese oak barrels; American Whiskeys : American whiskeys are divided into three main categories, Bourbon, Tennessee and Rye (which is also produced in Canada). In the first category, there are 3 different varieties: Bourbon (made from malted grains, at least 51% of which must be corn), Straight Bourbon (aged for at least two years and without additives such as flavors or dyes) and Blended Bourbon (which can include other alcoholic beverages and flavors). Tennessee has a production method identical to Bourbon, the difference is in the filtering process in a kind of molasses, adding an even sweeter taste.